2019 RVIA Economic Impact Study

RVs Move America infographic

RVs Move America Economic Impact Study was released June 3, 2019 at the RVIA annual meeting.

It revealed the RV industry has an overall economic impact on the US economy of $114 billion, supports nearly 600,000 jobs, with more than $32 billion in wages, and pays more than $12 billion in federal, state, and local taxes.

The announcement was made by Garry Enyart, RVIA chairman, and Onan/Cummins Director of Mobile Generator Sales & Coach Care.

For more information on the $114 billion total economic impact and what it includes, click here.

Gross Domestic Product by State: Second Quarter 2019

Thu Nov 7, 2019
Author: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

157314458636221.pngReal gross domestic product (GDP) increased in all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the second quarter of 2019, according to statistics released today by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. The percent change in real GDP in the second quarter ranged from 4.7 percent in Texas to 0.5 percent in Hawaii.

Professional, scientific and technical services; government; real estate and rental and leasing; and mining were the leading contributors to the increase in real GDP nationally. Mining increased 23.5 percent for the nation and was the leading contributor to the increases in Texas, Wyoming, Alaska and New Mexico—the fastest growing states.

Other Highlights
Professional, scientific and technical services increased 7.4 percent for the nation and contributed to growth in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Government increased 3.1 percent for the nation and contributed to growth in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Real estate and rental and leasing increased 2.6 percent for the nation and contributed to growth in 49 states and the District of Columbia.

Wholesale trade decreased 6.7 percent for the nation, subtracting from growth in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Wholesale trade was the leading contributor to slow growth in Hawaii, Maine and New Jersey—the slowest growing states.

For the full report, including additional graphs, charts, definitions and date, click here.