RVIA Economic Impact Study

The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association commissioned an Economic Impact Study on the RV industry, released on June 7, 2016. The study found that the RV industry contributes about $49.7 billion in economic output or 0.28 percent of the Gross Domestic Product. Through its production and distribution linkages, the industry impacts firms in 426 of the 440 sectors of the United States economy.

Nationwide, the industry is responsible for 216,170 jobs, both directly and inderectly, creating an economic impact of $37.5 billion. The full study results, along with each individual state and congressional district's economic impact is available on the website by clicking here .

Outdoor Industry Leaders Want Action on Wildfire Costs

Thu Jan 18, 2018

151631709982604.jpgThe Outdoor Recreation Industry Roundtable (ORIR) – which includes both major national RV associations -- has expressed its strong support for the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, legislation introduced in 2017 in both the United States Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

“Action is needed now to provide stability for long-term wildfire mitigation practices and to protect other vital public interests in our nation’s forests,” states a letter from ORIR on the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association’s website. The Recreational Vehicle Dealers Association is also part of ORIR, as well as 19 other outdoor industry associations.

“According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wildfire suppression costs surpassed $2.3 billion this year and more than 8.5 million acres burned, including vital recreation infrastructure,” states the Jan. 17 letter to the leaders of both parties in the U.S. House and Senate. “Fire suppression activities continue to rise as a percentage of the (U.S.) Forest Service’s budget. This rise has reduced investments in trails, campgrounds and other recreation infrastructure, much of which needs modernization and expansion. The agency estimates that it will devote more than 66 percent of its budget to firefighting by 2021, compared to 16 percent in 1995.”

The Forest Service reports that 80 million acres of its land are at high risk of catastrophic fire, but the soaring firefighting costs have cut the “pace and scale of proactive forest management,” the letter says.
“In the last two decades, the number of national forest employees has dropped from 19,000 to 11,000 while the number of firefighters has doubled.”

The Wildfire Disaster Funding Act would change the method for Forest Service budgeting to help eliminate the agency borrowing from its other program to pay for firefighting effort. A bi-partisan group of senators were the original sponsors, including Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Jim Risch, R-Idaho, Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., Cory Gardner, R-Colo., and Michael Bennet, D-Colo.

“Action is needed now to provide stability for long-term wildfire mitigation practices and to protect other vital public interests in our nation’s forests,” states the ORIR letter. CLICK HERE to download the letter. http://www.rvia.org/UniPop.cfm?v=2&OID=11551&CC=41888